Photo

Sep 25, 2014
@ 11:04 pm
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3 notes

brickfr0g:

I was explaining the new munchie meal options from Jack in the box to Connie and confirmed once again that we are the best at marketing.

Dorff Nguyen Media Solutions strikes again.

brickfr0g:

I was explaining the new munchie meal options from Jack in the box to Connie and confirmed once again that we are the best at marketing.

Dorff Nguyen Media Solutions strikes again.


Photoset

Sep 23, 2014
@ 12:15 am
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7,000 notes

chearsmag:

"L.A Eats" by Stephanie Gonot.

the composition in this will never not be beautiful to me

(via burgerrr)


Photo

Sep 22, 2014
@ 10:21 pm
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5 notes

brickfr0g:

this is a throwback from 2010 but the kickstarter will probz be up soon.

wow, our haircuts were so different back then.

brickfr0g:

this is a throwback from 2010 but the kickstarter will probz be up soon.

wow, our haircuts were so different back then.


Text

Sep 18, 2014
@ 8:18 am
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Read More


Photoset

Sep 17, 2014
@ 7:05 pm
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10,769 notes

gin-and-djinn:

ideal aesthetic

(via tenaangstroms)


Photo

Sep 13, 2014
@ 1:01 pm
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54 notes


Photoset

Sep 13, 2014
@ 12:26 am
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50,414 notes

[x]

PREACH IT.

(Source: stanleykubricky, via tenaangstroms)


Photo

Sep 11, 2014
@ 9:15 pm
Permalink
13,759 notes

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

(via brickfr0g)


Audio

Sep 8, 2014
@ 8:20 pm
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Played 5,099 times.
947 notes

brickfr0g:

vcrizzle:

REMEMBER THIS?

Yes, it is on repeat right now.

prion

not a year goes by w/o Martina and I jamming to this song.


Text

Sep 6, 2014
@ 11:01 pm
Permalink
45 notes

ohlivyuhuxtable:

tendads:

[jason mantzoukas voice] GUYS…

[jason mantzoukas voice] WHAT. IS… HYAPPENING.

it makes me happy to see that other people spell Zouk’s pronunciation of “happening” the same way.

(via brickfr0g)